A Metamodern Understanding of Time. Including a critique of William Blattner’s Heidegger’s Temporal Idealism

In the 1999 book Heidegger’s Temporal Idealism, William Blattner argues for something quite novel and interesting for his time. Blattner believes that Martin Heidegger’s Sein und Zeit (“Being and Time”) belongs to a philosophical project which can be exemplified by the philosophies of Plotinus, G.W. Leibniz, Immanuel Kant, and Henri Bergson. Blattner characterizes each of these thinkers, along…

Hegel’s Neglect of the Possible. Understanding Power and History in the Metamodern Political Project

Of principal importance to the metamodern political project is an understanding of both power and history. These two words direct our attention to particular obstacles which previous political projects have faced, but were not able to circumvent, such that we suffer from those same obstacles today. Common to the post-WWII period of thought is sociological…

A Definitive Introduction to Metamodern Metaphysics

Let us ask a question. Is it accidental that a pronounced moment of post-metaphysical thinking appears alongside the political projects invested in disarming and disempowering world institutions, or those invested in dismantling patriarchy, and the remaining after-effects of colonialism? Following WWII, the horrors of Nazi gas chambers and fears of atomic warfare had demanded that…

The “Consummation” and “End” of Metaphysics

Analyses in a recently published book, Division III of Heidegger’s Being and Time, serve to speculate on reasons why Martin Heidegger might have abandoned his 1927 magnum opus, Being and Time. As is well known, at the inception of Being and Time, Heidegger promises to answer “the sense of being”. His claim is that time must be brought to…